Author Topic: Loina Wa'a - Rules / Regulations of the Canoe  (Read 19225 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Tama

  • Moderator
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 92
  • Ta 'ule 'oe
    • Home page
Loina Wa'a - Rules / Regulations of the Canoe
« on: April 20, 2009, 10:08PM »
Loina Wa'a, or rules and regulation, are very similar to na loina set in hula.  The power of word and thought give much to the instruction transmitted by the teacher, in this case the coach. 

1.) Mai 'A'e - Don't step over people or their implements.  This is very inappropriate.  This is in regards to your wa'a, canoe.  Never step over the canoe.  If you must get to the other side of the canoe, take the time and walk all the way around the canoe.  Why, you ask?  In keeping with traditional values, Hawaiians / Polynesians, revered everything with dignity and kuleana (ku-lay-ana), respect.   To the kanaka maoli/hawaiian, the body held significant values, the head having the highest reverence.  In addition implements, whether it be hula or the canoe, had it's own reverence.  They were imbued with mana.  You disrespect the canoe, and negate it's mana when you step over it.  In addition you disrespect it as an entity.  Take for instance your paddle, it is an extension of you.  You disrespect it as a vital part of your connection to the canoe and to the ocean.    Another source of this meaning that i have been taught, had this to add:  Though the Hawaiians highly regarded ka ma'i, the genitals, as a extremely sacred part of the body, when you elevate yourself, the entire body, over your tools, implements, etc.. you are thusly saying, the object is less than, and inferior. 

2.) Malama i na mea ho'ohana - Take care of your implements.  Implements left unattended, thrown or cast aside are inappropriate.  Implements that are treated as rest objects, or door stops is inappropriate.  These implements are an extension of the paddler and of the spirit.  To cast them aside is to cast aside the opportunity toward gaining awareness.  This is in relation to #1.  Treat your paddle, the canoe, and the different elements of the canoe with respect, kuleana.  These things are basically extensions of the paddler.  You wouldn't treat your arm or your leg with disdain? 

3.) Ma'ema'e ka no'ono'o - All thoughts should be positive.  Negativity of thought will be reflected in action.  Be careful to not allow negative thoughts get in the way of instruction.  When in the process of learning or executing, keeping a positive mind results in positive action. 

4.) Maika'i wale ka waha - "only good the mouth"  Negativity begets negativity.  When we start to become negative and exude that negativity, it becomes contagious and thus infects others in the wa'a with you. 

5.) Mai namunamu - "no gossiping".  Civility on all levels should be monitored.  Complaints and or gossip are too contagious to the collapse of a unified canoe.


I know that some of this may sound pedestrian, but as a haumana (student) of hula, these loina are transparent, whether it be hula or paddling, they still apply.  See it as trivial or seriously ponder it's meanings. 

The rules were given to me via ko'u na kumu hula (my hula instructors) Sissy and Annette Kaio & Tanguo Taupori
« Last Edit: April 27, 2009, 01:01PM by Tama »
"You will be living in the haole time, and the wise thing to do is to move with the time, because time is a thing that belongs to no one....There's only one thing I ask of you, my children - You are Hawai'i, and I would appreciate that you remain Hawaii"

Jim

  • Guest
Re: Loina Wa'a
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2009, 10:16PM »
Sometimes a novice or somebody is unaware and will step over the canoe.  When that happens, besides having us berate the poor bugger, is there anything the offender should do for atonement? 

Tama

  • Moderator
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 92
  • Ta 'ule 'oe
    • Home page
Re: Loina Wa'a
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2009, 10:33PM »
@kavaboy

There's different atonement 'i ka wa kahiko', in the olden times.  If it were an Ali'i canoe or Mo'i, because they're status was higher than most, some feared death or other harsh punishments.  Alas, those days are behind us.  To atone these days, I could not answer that question.  That's one to seek the answer to.  I think the best thing that could be done, would to make he or she aware of the tradition, and to remind them of it in the future....  and of course still berate the poor bugger.
« Last Edit: April 20, 2009, 10:35PM by Tama »
"You will be living in the haole time, and the wise thing to do is to move with the time, because time is a thing that belongs to no one....There's only one thing I ask of you, my children - You are Hawai'i, and I would appreciate that you remain Hawaii"

billiegirl

  • Women's Team
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 25
Re: Loina Wa'a
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2009, 11:16PM »
a little bit of history...i think this might be my favorite part of the forum

Tama

  • Moderator
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 92
  • Ta 'ule 'oe
    • Home page
Re: Loina Wa'a
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2009, 10:57AM »
@billiegirl

What kind of history you thinking about, strictly canoe history?
"You will be living in the haole time, and the wise thing to do is to move with the time, because time is a thing that belongs to no one....There's only one thing I ask of you, my children - You are Hawai'i, and I would appreciate that you remain Hawaii"

Francesco

  • Alumni
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 21
  • acqua lover
Re: Loina Wa'a
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2009, 11:31AM »
Tama, thanks for sharing the rules brother.

billiegirl

  • Women's Team
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 25
Re: Loina Wa'a
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2009, 11:39AM »
the history of canoe, and the traditional ways , really from the pacific islands.  there is alot of history from the pacific that we dont get much of a chance to learn.  you really gotta own your knowledge when it comes to that.  this was a great idea. thanks

leslie

  • Guest
Re: Loina Wa'a
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2009, 11:48AM »
This is all great information!!!  I love learning about Hawaiian, Polynesian and canoe history and traditions.

kzuelch

  • Guest
Re: Loina Wa'a - Rules / Regulations of the Canoe
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2009, 02:07PM »
Last year I started to look into more information on this Crazy sport Outrigger Canoe and I came across a great picture of the canoe with all the parts pointed out and given the proper Hawaiian name.  I have attached the jpg to his post for those of you who would like to learn that.

Sunshine!

Tama

  • Moderator
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 92
  • Ta 'ule 'oe
    • Home page
Re: Loina Wa'a - Rules / Regulations of the Canoe
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2009, 03:33PM »
Mahalo e Pā'anakalā no ke ki'i...  Eia nā meme'a i ka wa'a:

Thank you Sunshine for the image... Here are the terms for the canoe:

paddle - hoe (ho - ay)
bow - ihu wa'a (eehu * va-a)
stern - hope wa'a (ho-pay * va-a)
nose end piece - kupe ihu (ku-pay * eehu)
rear end piece - kupe hope (ku-pay * eehu)
outrigger float - ama (ah-ma)
outrigger boom - 'iako (YAH-ko)
tied end of outrigger boom to the canoe - kua 'iako (koo-ah * YAH-ko)
seats - noho (no-ho)
front end sea spary guard - pale kai (pah-lay * ka-ee)
hull or body - kino (kee-noh)
Part of the canoe float where the outrigger boom (ʻiako) is joined - kapua'i (kah-pu-wah-EE)
Flattened end of the forward end of the outrigger float outside of the joining of the outrigger boom to the float - lupe (loo-pay)
After end of the float of a canoe - kanaka (kah-nah-kah)
Starboard ends of ʻiako (outrigger booms) - muku (moo-koo)
Canoe hold under both the foreward cover and after cover - pika'o (peeee-KAH-oh)
Mat covering for a canoe, sometimes with crew sticking their heads out through holes in the mat - pā'ū (paaaa-uuuu)

« Last Edit: April 21, 2009, 03:36PM by Tama »
"You will be living in the haole time, and the wise thing to do is to move with the time, because time is a thing that belongs to no one....There's only one thing I ask of you, my children - You are Hawai'i, and I would appreciate that you remain Hawaii"

billiegirl

  • Women's Team
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 25
Re: Loina Wa'a - Rules / Regulations of the Canoe
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2009, 01:08AM »
tama

i was wondering, were people that traveled in the canoes back in the day the warriors?  i think i remember hearing that paddling was the sport or something for the warriors, and surfing for the royal people.  something like that.  and i was wondering if a warrior who was ready to fight would be considered a negative thought.  i was just curious.

thanks billie :-\

Tama

  • Moderator
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 92
  • Ta 'ule 'oe
    • Home page
Re: Loina Wa'a - Rules / Regulations of the Canoe
« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2009, 09:01PM »
@billiegirl

I don't think that all were only warriors per se.  Early settlers of all were from different casts.  Na Ali'i and Na Mo'i travelled in canoes of course, most often times in double hulls.  Canoes were used by everyone from maka'ainana (commoners) to na koa kaua (warrioirs) to Alii.  Hawaii was settled by sea faring voyagers, who sailed canoes.  The larger migration of the pacific, was done with the use of the wa'a as the vehicle.   After the settling of Hawaii, main travel between islands of course was ka wa'a.  Many maka'ainana had their own canoes for fishing etc... 

As far as the sport aspect being regarded only for warriors and surfing for Ali'i.  I'd have to do more delving to answer that.  I know at one point in time that he'e nalu (surfing) was in fact only for Ali'i.  But at what point did that change... couldn't tell you... yet.  As far as the sport for warriors, like i said, I'll have to turn to my kumu and alaka'i (mentor) for that answer. 

As far as your last question about prepared warriors being considered negative.  That's kind of a hard one.  I know through my halau (hula school) I'm taught that a warrior is proud and stands up for what he/she believes in.  But we haven't really delved into the social aspects of that, what others really thought of warriors.  I know that within Hawaiian culture, there were different points of view about what one did as a way of life; fight, garden, fish, worship, etc...  But I could not imagine that they would have negative connotations because, as a matter of an Ali'i or Mo'i or Konohiki, was guardianship of your land, and those that lived there.  In early Hawaii, they had something similar to a feudal society like Europe, but it wasn't as harsh and taxing.  It was a mutual existence between monarchies, maka'ainana, warriors and slaves (yes Hawaiians had slaves).  Seeing as how much of what we garner of ancient warriors in hawaii does not predate the early 1700's it's hard to really say what really went on.  But one thing is known, is that there was a multitude of warriors and armies.  And with many commoners and slaves to draw upon, when an Ali'i went to battle he would often times con scribe the commoners to fight as well.  with that happening, i would find it difficult to have negative connotations for warriors. 

hope that answers the questions. 

"You will be living in the haole time, and the wise thing to do is to move with the time, because time is a thing that belongs to no one....There's only one thing I ask of you, my children - You are Hawai'i, and I would appreciate that you remain Hawaii"

billiegirl

  • Women's Team
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 25
Re: Loina Wa'a - Rules / Regulations of the Canoe
« Reply #12 on: April 24, 2009, 09:19PM »
totally does.  thx

Tama

  • Moderator
  • -
  • *
  • Posts: 92
  • Ta 'ule 'oe
    • Home page
In going through our very own site, I had forgotten that there is similar information that can be read there:

http://www.marinaoutrigger.org/content/view/332/77/

Mirage
131 Ho'opili= "Coming together"
135 Kai Nalu=Ocean Wave (nod to longtime member Greg Shagoian and the club he started by same name)

Bradley Lightning
134 La`iākea = "vast, calm ocean"
132 Ho'opuka-O-Hākikili= "emergence of thunder"

Bradley Striker
126 Kahanamoku= In honor of Sandy Kahanamoku, co-founder of the club

Bradley Racer
133 `Uhane O Kekuewa = The spirit of Kekuewa (In honor of Steve Kekeuwa, co-founder of the club)
84 Pau Kikī = "to finish swiftly"
82 Kekoa = "the brave, fearless, courageous"

Malia
Lea At one time, one of the fastest Malias on the coast, a proud history of many races, and many wins


RESPECTING YOUR OUTRIGGER (or Outrigger 101)

The following article is part of THE HANA HOU SERIES found at http://holoholo.org/hanahou/

Respecting Your Outrigger
© 1999 Kawika Sands


1. Respect every canoe as a family member. From the time a canoe is made and blessed, the canoe becomes an entity unto itself. Care for it as a loved one by maintaining it before setting out to sea and cleaning it after you return. Never sit on, or step over, a canoe (exceptions are sometimes made for dry-land training or demonstration purposes). If you must, support the hull along the kua`e/keel (the center line along the outside/bottom of the hull) in a way that will distribute the weight evenly to avoid placing too much stress at any one point. In Hawai`i, it is believed that to step over another is to cut their life shorter, therefore, the same applies to your canoe.

2. On land, the canoe always faces the ocean. This relates back to ancient Hawai`i when canoes were frequently used to repel attacks from other islands. "Stacking" is sometimes necessary to accommodate available space (placing the ama of a subsequent canoe on the `iako of a previous canoe).

3. Care should also be taken for the area surrounding the canoe. Pick up opala (rubbish) on and around your paena wa`a (canoe landing), halau wa`a (canoe house), or auha (canoe shed). Put things away that need to be stored without being asked.
- Hoe aku i ka wa`a (literal meaning: move ahead the canoe; figurative meaning: do your share).

4. Everyone helps when the canoe is being carried, covered, cleaned or cared for. This includes loading and unloading the canoes, covering or storing them, cleaning them and washing them down with fresh water (especially the lashings) when they are dirty or after practice, and checking all parts of the canoe before and after practice. This applies to every member of the club from the first time novice to the president. From ancient times, whenever there was a large undertaking, everyone would help by doing whatever he or she could. The strong would do the work, the old would offer encouragement and advice, and the young would bring the water and food, but everyone would participate.
- A`ohe hana nui ka alu`ia. (No task is too big when done together).

5. Customarily, a prayer is always said before every launching no matter how long or short the voyage. The prayer needn't be long and perhaps not in Hawaiian, nor does it have to be religious in nature. Doing so helps center the crew mentally and spiritually (no religious reference).

6. On water, avoid standing, arguing and swearing in the canoe. Standing is rarely a good idea for stability and safety reasons anyway. Arguing and swearing only serves to upset the entire crew's efforts and create animosity instead of aloha. Avoid tracking dirt and sand into the outrigger when you climb aboard.
-`Ike aku, `ike mai, kokua aku, kokua mai. Pela iho la ka nohana `ohana (Recognize others, be recognized, help others, be helped. Such is a family relationship).

7. Learn the particular duties that go along with the seat you sit in. Once you step into a canoe you are part of a team. Therefore every hoa wa`a (canoe mate) must work together by doing his share. The only way to know what is expected of each member is to have clearly defined assignments before hand.
-Komo mai kau mapuna hoe (Dip your paddle in. Join in the effort.)

8. See to it that personal issues are put to rest quickly instead of letting them collect and fester in your mind. Remember; what happens on land, stays on land, what happens at sea, stays at sea. Show respect, enthusiasm and commitment to your hoa wa`a by arriving on time to practice (steersmen, coaches and other leaders should ALWAYS arrive early).
-A leader is never on time, he is always early.

9. Take the time to study and learn the proper Hawaiian names and pronunciation of the things you use. On this issue, if you choose to use English (usually the case), or Tahitian, etc. that is entirely fine. But if you choose to use Hawaiian terminology, take care in its pronunciation (and use). Many Hawaiian words have multiple meanings or have different meanings if pronounced incorrectly. Lest you be guilty of `olelo ho`ohepa (idiot talk).


Hawaiian Outrigger Traditions

The following traditions should be respected and followed at all times.

∑ Tying ti leaves to the canoe brings good luck.

∑ Donít step over the boats at any time; walk around the canoe. Stepping over a canoe brings it bad luck. Respect the competitionís boats as well.

∑ Refer to canoe parts by their Hawaiian names.

∑ Each canoe should be treated with the respect of a living person.

∑ Do not sit in the boat on dry land (except for instruction), as the canoe is considered sacred and part of you. Treat the canoe as a person.

∑ Do not swear or argue in or around the canoe. This brings bad luck and slows the canoe.

∑ Before each race the team gathers to give blessings and prayers of hope and thanksgiving.

∑ After each race the teammates greet each other and congratulate them on the race.

∑ When the canoes are on dry land, the nose of the canoe should point to the water. The early Hawaiians did this out of respect for the canoe and its spirit.
"You will be living in the haole time, and the wise thing to do is to move with the time, because time is a thing that belongs to no one....There's only one thing I ask of you, my children - You are Hawai'i, and I would appreciate that you remain Hawaii"